Game Review: NASCAR Heat Evolution

Photo: Gamespot

By: Kobe Lambeth

On September 13, 2016, I purchased NASCAR Heat Evolution just like many NASCAR fans who were eagerly awaiting the newest NASCAR game. Based on the feedback I have received by gamers, the overall response to the game as a whole is not good. Some people referred to the game as “a waste of money” or a “massive disappoint.” In my opinion, the game definitely has its flaws as every video game does, but I certainly see much potential in Dusenberry Martin Racing and Monster Games. Please take into consideration that this is their first game.

When I started playing the game, I loved the fact that we have the opportunity to pick our favorite driver, and have the option to use other drivers at any point. At first, one massive disappoint was unlocking tracks instead of having them all available at first. Also, the graphics and physics were not as “authentic” as I expected. An example of a questionable moment was Martin Truex Jr running in the mid-30s at some tracks. Why is a Chase contender running so poorly? Also, a certain driver is finishing in the top 15 consistently, while driving for an underfunded team. Certainly, it is cool to see an underfunded team finish well at a 1.5 mile track, but is that really realistic at a non-restrictor plate track? At this point, I was seriously thinking about quitting the game and completely give up on it. Then, I started thinking how much it reminded me of my days on PlayStation 2. The days of being a seven-year-old boy enjoying life not caring about the graphics nor physics.

After spending a few hours fiddling around with the game, I began to experience the same happiness I felt as a young elementary school boy learning the ropes about NASCAR racing. Of course, NASCAR Heat Evolution is not perfect because I do not think there is a perfect game in existence.

Close your eyes, think for a minute, clear your mind, and listen to what I have to say. There is a timid boy, who is elected as a section leader in his school’s marching band. However, the other students give him a hard time because they do not think he is capable of being successful. The boy feels awful that his fellow classmates refuse to give him a chance and laugh at the fact that he is a leader. How would you feel if you were in this boy’s shoes? Personally, I would feel terrible and deeply hurt if my classmates thought of me as a leader being a big joke.

I want you to think of the game as the timid boy, who is not given a chance to show his true potential because his classmates are too quick to make assumptions about his leadership abilities. To be honest, this is how I treated NASCAR Heat Evolution and I am very ashamed of myself. My mother taught me not to be so quick to make assumptions about others or something like the video game. As I continued to play the game, I enjoyed it and made some adjustments with the AI to adapt to my skills. I cannot tell you to buy the game or not to buy it because the decision is completely up to you. If you have a special virtue called “patience,” then the game is totally for you. If you are not, then please spend your money elsewhere. Patience is definitely required.

How many of you expected this article to solely be about NASCAR Heat Evolution? If the answer is yes then I have proven my point. Never judge a book by its cover.

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